Chateau Latour 2010

Review of the Estate

Established in the 1670s, the vineyards of Château Latour are some of the oldest in the Médoc, pre-dating the existing Château (which was built between 1862 and 1864) by almost 200 years.

The grandiose Tower of St Lambert depicted on the wine’s label is instantly recognisable. Built as a fortress during the Hundred Years’ War in the late 1300s, it was burned to the ground in the 1450s and replaced by a pigeon tower, built from the stones of the former Château, between 1620 and 1630.

It was not until the early 18th century that Chateau Latour came to prominence as a producer of first class wines. This success can largely be attributed to the demands of a budding wine market in Northern Europe and the Marquis de Ségur’s concurrent investment in Chateau Latour's vineyard and winery. Ownership remained in the de Ségur family for almost 300 years until 1963 when three quarters of the shares in Château Latour were sold to a British company, the Pearson group.

The intensive modernisation and attention to detail that followed this change in ownership has continued with the management of Francois Pinault, the current owner of Chateau Latour, who acquired the estate in 1993. Together Pinault and Frédéric Engerer, his estate manager, are renowned for producing exemplary yet consistent wines, which are especially fine, even in weaker vintages. This notable finesse, as any discerning consumer will attest, is an exceptional and rare occurrence.

 

Vineyard

Surface area: 160.5 acres

Grape Varieties: 75% Cabernet Sauvignon, 20% Merlot, 4% Cabernet Franc and 1% Petit Verdot

Average age of vines: 40 years

Density of plantation: 10,00 vines per hectare

Average yields: 45 hectoliters per hectare

Average cases produced: 14,500 per year

Plateau of maturity: 15 - 50 years


Chateau Latour

Chateau Latour Bottles

Chateau Latour

Chateau Latour Label

Robert Parker Latour 2010 Review

Score: 100 Points

Bizarre as it may sound, the 2010 Les Forts de Latour is also the finest I have ever tasted from this selection, which comes from specific vineyards, not really so much a second wine as just another wine from estate holdings. A blend of 72.5% Cabernet Sauvignon and 27.5% Merlot that represents 40% of the production, this astonishing wine hit 14.3% natural alcohol. Extremely ripe and rich, it reminds me of the 1982 on steroids (and that wine is still drinking great 30 years after the vintage). Sensational notes of graphite, crushed rocks, black fruits, camphor and damp forest notes are present in this expansive, savory, full-throttle wine, which is better than many vintages of the great Latour itself from the past. (That may be a heretical statement, but it’s the truth as I see it.) This wine needs a good 5-6 years of cellaring and should age for three decades at minimum, given the fact that the 1982 is in terrific form and wasn’t this concentrated or prodigious. There is no denying the outrage and recriminations over the decision by the Pinault family and their administrator, Frederic Engerer, to pull Latour off the futures market next year. However, you can still buy these 2010s, although the first two wines are not likely to be released until they have more maturity, which makes sense from my perspective. Perhaps Latour may have offended a few loyal customers who were buying wines as futures, but they are trying to curtail all the interim speculation that occurs with great vintages of their wines (although only God knows what a great vintage of future Latour will bring at seven or eight years after the harvest). As a set of wines, the 2010s may be the Pinaults’ and Engerer’s greatest achievements to date. Of course, I suspect the other first-growth families won’t want to hear that, nor will most of the negociants in Bordeaux, but it’s just the way things are. Frederic Engerer, by no means the most modest of administrators at the first growths, thinks it would be virtually impossible to produce a wine better than this, and he may well be correct. If they gave out Academy Awards for great performances in wine, the Pinaults and Engerer would certainly fetch a few in 2010. P.S. Just so you don’t worry, Engerer offered up the 2009 next to the 2010 to see if I thought it was still a 100-point wine, and yes, ladies and gentlemen, it still is.

Score: 100

 

Chateau Latour 2010 Recent Price History

Prices below are sourced from wine-searcher.com 

WineVintageMay 2011 
Value Per Case
July 2013 
Value Per Case
Value Increase Percentage 
Increase
Latour 2010 £12,084 £12,660 £576 4.77%

Chateau Latour Wine List

Latour 1990 Latour 1991 Latour 1992
Latour 1993 Latour 1994 Latour 1995
Latour 1996 Latour 1997 Latour 1998
Latour 1999 Latour 2000 Latour 2001
Latour 2002 Latour 2003 Latour 2004
Latour 2005 Latour 2006 Latour 2007
Latour 2008 Latour 2009 Latour 2010
Latour 2011    

 

Bordeaux Investment Wines - Chateau Latour 2010 Review

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