Chateau Margaux 1994

Review of the Estate

Château Margaux is known for producing some of the silkiest, most aromatic wines in Bordeaux and it has been famous for doing so for centuries. The origins of the estate may be traced back to the 15th century when the Lestonnac family took over a grain growing property known as Lamothe (deriving from la motte – meaning a small rise in the land, or hill). The agricultural change from cereal crops to vines was led by Pierre de Lestonnac from 1572 to 1582. Further developments occurred when, over a century later, Chateau Margaux estate manager, Monsieur Berlon, saw the benefits of vinifying red and white grapes separately. This change was what set Chateau Margaux firmly on the path to modern vinification practices and international renown.

This reputation spread over the next several hundred years. Sir Robert Walpole, the English Prime Minister in the early 18th Century, declared himself an avid supporter of Chateau Margaux and was known to purchase four casks every three months! When the Marquis de la Colonilla purchased the estate in the early 19th century, the outstanding reputation of Chateua Margaux’s wines demanded an impressive chateau to match. Built in 1810 by Louis Combes, the current chateau is a unique example of the neo-classical style. With its structured façade, balanced by ionic columns, it exudes a refined elegance not dissimilar to that of the wines produced within. Chateau Margaux was officially recognised as an historic monument in 1946.

Today Chateau Margaux is owned by Corinne Mentzelopoulos. Her father, André, purchased the estate in 1977 and invested significantly in the regeneration of the vineyard and winery by installing new drainage systems, replanting vines, creating a new underground cellar and investing in new oak barrels. The result of these improvements is evident in the spectacular and consistent vintages produced by Chateau Margaux since the 1978 vintage. This has allowed Chateau Margaux to remain a dominant force in a highly competitive market and maintain its preeminent global reputation.

 

Vineyard

Surface area: 192.7 acres

Grape Varieties: 75% Cabernet Sauvignon, 20% Merlot, 5% Cabernet Franc and Petit Verdot

Average age of vines: 35 years

Density of plantation: 10,00 vines per hectare

Average yields: 45 hectoliters per hectare

Average cases produced: 16,500 per year

Plateau of maturity: 9 - 35 years

 

 

Chateau Margaux

 

 

Chateau Margaux Bottles

 

 

Chateau Margaux 

 

Chateau Margaux Label

Robert Parker Margaux 1994 Review

Score: 91+ Points 

This largely forgotten vintage seems to have turned the corner in the last year or two. Because of strict selections made at the top châteaux, the wines always had density, but the level of tannin was frequently too high and the type of tannin was more green and astringent. Château Margaux's 1994 has always been one of the candidates for the "wine of the vintage." The wine still has a dense plum/purple colour and a big, sweet nose of black fruits intermixed with licorice, camphor, vanilla and a hint of flowers. The wine is dense and powerful, but the tannins have softened and do not seem as hard and intrusive as they did in the late 1990's. This wine will last for decades and hopefully become even more seamless, although it is hard to believe all the tannin will gradually dissipate. Anticipated maturity:2008-2025.

Score: 91+

Robert Parker,

 

Chateau Margaux 1994 Recent Price History

Prices below are sourced from wine-searcher.com

WineVintageJuly 2008 
Value Per Case
July 2013 
Value Per Case
Value Increase Percentage 
Increase
Margaux 1994 £2,304 £3,540 £1,236 53.60%

Chateau Margaux Wine List

Margaux 1990 Margaux 1991 Margaux 1992
Margaux 1993 Margaux 1994 Margaux 1995
Margaux 1996 Margaux 1997 Margaux 1998
Margaux 1999 Margaux 2000 Margaux 2001
Margaux 2002 Margaux 2003 Margaux 2004
Margaux 2005 Margaux 2006 Margaux 2007
Margaux 2008 Margaux 2009 Margaux 2010
Margaux 2011    

 

Bordeaux Investment Wines - Chateau Margaux 1994 Review

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